2,000 to 10,000 by Rachel Aaron

Aaron

Writing several thousand words a day is something my “pantser” friends achieve regularly. Those who write without an outline find it easy to open the computer and just write. For pantsers, the solution to a creative block is to keep writing, knowing the narrative will work itself out. And if it doesn’t, there are always revisions.

Until I read 2,000 to 10,000 I assumed that fast writing was something only pantsers did. But Aaron busts the myth that pantsers write quickly and plotters write slowly. She details the exact method she used to increase her daily word count from 2,000 words a day to 10,000 words a day. Now those of us in the “plotter” camp have the tools we need to write quickly, too.

The core of Aaron’s method is to make sure you have the time, knowledge, and enthusiasm to write. Aaron schedules huge blocks of writing time, but even if you can’t manage that, figuring out when you are the most productive, and keeping track of word counts really helps. Knowledge refers to having a plan in place for that day’s writing by pre-plotting with an outline. Enthusiasm is self-explanatory. We all write faster when we’re excited about what’s on the page.

The second half of the book delves into the nitty-gritty of Aaron’s plotting methods. She makes very detailed outlines that serve her well, and ensures her novels need less editing on the back end.

Aaron gives plenty of disclaimers all through the book. Her method works brilliantly for her, but it might not work for everyone. That’s okay. She gives so many tools and tips, every writer will get something from her advice. Even if a writer only finds half of Aaron’s tips useful and only increases her productivity a little bit, she’s got her money’s worth from the book. But I predict that every writer who reads 2,000 to 10,000 will start to write faster—and better—than she ever did before.

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rating: 4 stars

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pie slices: 6 slices craft, 2 slices inspiration

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This book is best for: intermediate writers

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I recommend this book

 

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