Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch

I used to worry about the state of the English language every time I used social media. Faced with a wall of misspellings, incorrect grammar, and wild punctuation, I despaired for my mother tongue. I sometimes reminded myself that until the digital age, public writing was something that professionals did, and we never read printed words from an average person. Perhaps most writing was always terrible, it’s just that we didn’t see most of it. Other times, I worried that nobody cared about the “rules” of writing and we were all doomed to a slow slide into illiteracy.

BECAUSE INTERNET showed me that my assumptions were wrong on all counts. It’s not that people are using English incorrectly, it’s that they’re adapting language to their needs. Until recently, we had formal writing and informal speech.  For example, you’d start a letter to your grandma with “Dear Grandmother,” but when you saw her in person, you’d say, “Hi, Gran!” However, with the rise of social media, for the first time, we have informal writing.

Internet language isn’t incorrect, and it doesn’t signal the end of good grammar. It’s simply a way of expressing the informality of speech in a written format. Nor should we worry about young people being unduly influenced by it. McCulloch sites studies that show that students can easily code-switch into formal writing when required for tests or papers.

BECAUSE INTERNET takes a deep dive into internet language, starting with its history. McCulloch explains why different generations use language differently on the internet. Users are roughly divided by age, but more importantly, by when they first got online. Like all good linguists, McCulloch is descriptive rather than prescriptive, explaining why and how language is changing without ever judging people for it.

Because when it comes right down to it, the way that we write when we’re online makes sense. When we’re face to face, we communicate so much in body language, tone, and facial expressions. Written words don’t express tone of voice, so we sometimes use uppercase for emphasis, or add asterisks or tildes. We use /s to indicate that this is sarcasm or a joke, but we use a mix of uppercase and lowercase letters to indicate mockery. We misspell on purpose for humor or to pull out a word, as in, “I allllmost forgot my phone,” or the Tumblr favorite, “sameeee” to indicate absolute agreement.

And when words aren’t enough, we use GIFs to show a facial expression, or turn to emojis. McCulloch gives a detailed explanation of the history and purpose of emojis. They aren’t taking the place of body language, since body language is unconscious. Emojis are deliberate, and therefore represent gestures, such as a thumbs up or a shrug. McCulloch details how and why emojis are used and by whom. (I laughed the first time my mom sent me an emoji. It looked strange because most senior citizens don’t use them.)  

BECAUSE INTERNET is not written in an academic tone. It’s easy to read, sharp, insightful, and quite funny in parts. It gave me new appreciation for the way that language is changing right before our eyes, with the birth of new grammar for the digital age.

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BECAUSE INTERNET can be found here

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Rating: 4 stars

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This book is best for: all writers

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I recommend this book

Bonus Blog: Valentine Giveaway

Valentine’s Day is almost here. It’s a day to celebrate love of all kinds, and if there is one thing we need more of these days, it’s love. I wish I could buy a present for every single person who reads this blog. However, that’s too many presents! Instead, I’m giving away two gift boxes to two people who comment on today’s blog.

Each gift box includes books and goodies for writers, along with a bar of artisan soap made by me! My soap is loaded with skin-loving ingredients and scented with amazing fragrances. (Because the world needs more love, but it also needs more hand washing!)

This year, I’m once again highlighting a how-to book from my favorite writing teacher of all time. A WRITER PREPARES by Lawrence Block is a memoir of his earliest days as a writer. It’s filled with wit and wisdom, and feels like reminiscing with a friend. You’re going to love this book! The box also includes a paperback copy of THE BIG-PICTURE REVISION CHECKLIST, along with a notebook, a keychain, and a bar of handmade artisan soap.

The second box is all Alex Kourvo books. It includes a hardcover copy of THE BIG-PICTURE REVISION CHECKLIST and a paperback of NO HERO WANTS TO SAVE THE WORLD. The box also includes a notebook, a keychain, and a bar of handmade artisan soap.

Want to win a gift box? It’s easy to enter! Just leave a comment below telling me two things: which how-to book is your favorite, and a place I can contact you (Email, website, or Twitter).

I’ll draw two random names from the comments to this blog post on February 14, 2022 at 21:00 EST so be sure to comment before then!

You don’t have to subscribe to my blog or follow me on social media to enter, but I’d be pleased if you did. (I’m @ AlexKourvo on insta and twitter)

This giveaway is open to everyone but I can only mail boxes to US addresses. If you live outside the US and I draw your name, I’ll send you a $20 Amazon ecard instead.

Leave me a comment with a book recommendation, and I’ll announce the winners on Valentine’s Day.

xxoo,
Alex K.

Update: The winner of the gift boxes are Greta Picklesimer and Michael Burstein.

Two Big Things Happened Today

Hello, friends!

I have two exciting announcements.

My second how-two book for writers was published today! Cue the confetti cannons and balloon drop! I am so excited to share this book with you.

No Hero Wants to Save the World is both in-depth and accessible. I wanted to give you a clear understanding of story stakes and give you action steps so you could start working on your own manuscript right away.

No Hero Wants to Save the World is a compact-yet-meaty book that takes a fresh look at story stakes and cuts through all the myths that have been holding writers back. I guarantee that when you finish this book you will never look at story stakes the same way again!

Are we celebrating today? You bet we’re celebrating!

My second announcement is that The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is on sale today. To celebrate the publication of No Hero Wants to Save the World, my first book is having a little flash sale. For two days only, the ebook of The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is on sale for $1.99.

If you missed The Big-Picture Revision Checklist when it first came out, now’s your chance to get the ebook for less than half price! This sale won’t last long, so if you want a copy at this amazing price, you’ll have to act fast.

And if you’ve read either of my how-to books, if they’ve helped you in any way, I’d love a review on your favorite bookselling site. Reviews help other readers find me and help raise my profile so I can keep writing books.

I’ll be back in February for my regular book review, along with my annual Valentine’s Day giveaway. In the meantime, happy reading, and happy writing!

Alex K.

Guest Review from Lawrence Block: The Big-Picture Revision Checklist by Alex Kourvo

Today’s book review is a bit different. Instead of a book review by me, it’s a review of the book I wrote! Lawrence Block is visiting the blog today to share his thoughts about THE BIG-PICTURE REVISION CHECKLIST.

Alex Kourvo is one of a kind. A gifted writer and editor, she has developed a special interest in books for writers, how-to manuals for those of us who want to find the best words and put them in their best order. Pursuing this interest, she has devoted much of her time to reading those books, digesting their contents, and reviewing them for the benefit of those writers who are her readers.

Full disclosure: I’ve written instructional books for writers myself, and Alex has been gracious enough to say very nice things about some of them.

I recall an observation of science fiction writer Samuel R. Delany: “I write the books I cannot find on library shelves.” Alex’s shelves are extensive, but the book she couldn’t find was one on writing a novel’s second draft. And so she’s written The Big-Picture Revision Checklist, designed to shepherd a writer who’s already produced a novel’s first draft.

More full disclosure: I’m an anomaly. I’ve produced a substantial body of work over many years, and while I certainly tweak sentences and rework scenes as I go along, my first draft is my final draft. So I’m probably not the best person to swear to the efficacy of Alex’s suggestions. But her book is cogent and persuasive, and now that she’s been considerate enough to write it, it’s there to be found on the shelf—where you’ll be fortunate to make its acquaintance.

Lawrence Block

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The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is in paperback and ebook at all retailers.

Bonus Blog: Don’t Take My Word for It

The Big-Picture Revision Checklist comes out October 1st, and you can pre-order your ebook or your paperback today. But you may be wondering, why should you pre-order a book that you haven’t even glanced through yet? The author says it’s good, but authors always say that about their own books. Maybe we should get a second opinion or three.

Here’s what Sacha Black had to say.

You know how to draft a book, you know how to proof for commas, but what happens in the middle? The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is a fantastic tool to help you assess and do a developmental edit of your novel. If you’ve ever struggled to do the big-picture edit, you need this book. Packed with examples and comprehensive explanations, this is the perfect guide to help you through edits. Whether you’re a new writer or a seasoned pro, you’ll find tips, tricks and helpful reminders to keep you on track while editing. 

Fellow editors like Chris Allen-Riley quite like the book as well.

This book will not only walk you through the revision process step by step, it will also entertain and encourage you. Alex Kourvo and her process are nothing short of life-changing. Reading The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is like sitting down with your BFF and sorting out exactly what your book needs to take it to the next level (and beyond).

And here is Lawrence Block.

Alex Kourvo is one of a kind. A gifted writer and editor.

One more note: I won’t be writing a book review on October 1st because Lawrence Block is going to take over the Writing Slices blog for the day and write a full review of The Big-Picture Revision Checklist. Stay tuned to watch Alex’s head explode in rainbows and sparkles!

Until then, happy writing, and happy re-writing!

Alex K.

Alex Kourvo Wrote a How-to Book

I have a new book coming soon! It’s called THE BIG-PICTURE REVISION CHECKLIST and it’s going to be published in paperback and ebook October 1st. The ebook is available for pre-order on every major retailer.

I’ve reviewed over 200 how-to books on the Writing Slices blog, but I couldn’t find a book like this on my shelves. I’ve read many wonderful books about writing a first draft, and many about improving a book through copyediting, but I haven’t seen a book about that special middle draft, where an author is rethinking the big picture.

So I wrote one.

The Big-Picture Revision Checklist is the guide you need to revise your novel. It will help you make likable protagonists who are flawed in exactly the right ways, and antagonists that readers love to hate. You’ll crank up your story stakes and pinpoint the five crucial scenes every novel needs. With in-depth chapters and examples from contemporary fiction, this clear-eyed manual gives you all the tools you need to bring your book to the finish line.

The book is short and to the point, so you can get to revising your novel right away.

Pre-orders are available wherever books are sold, worldwide. When the book is published, you can order the paperback online or at your local bookstore.

Get THE BIG-PICTURE REVISION CHECKLIST for a step-by-step guide to a polished and professional novel you’ll be proud of.

From Page to Stage by Betsy Graziani Fasbinder

Everyone expects that writers will do a bit of public speaking—book tours for the most successful writers and at least one or two local events for those in the midlist. Authors of books for children are expected to do school visits, speaking to the most demanding audience of all. But in the social media era, opportunities for authors to speak have exploded. Authors are supposed to seek out chances to be on podcasts and Zoom with book clubs and post to their Instagram stories. Staying home and writing just isn’t enough anymore.

Never mind that most authors are introverts who dislike the spotlight. Readers assume that authors who are interesting and dynamic on the page will be equally engaging in real life, even though holding a pen and holding the stage are completely different skillsets.

Fear of public speaking is real, but it’s a lot less scary with FROM PAGE TO STAGE as a guide. Fasbinder is a public speaking coach who specializes in writers, so she has tips tailored to our specific needs. She understands how hard it is to talk about our novels and memoirs, when really, we just want people to read them.

Fasbinder begins by calming writers’ nerves, reminding us that there are lots of rewards for speaking in public. She then provides all the tools necessary, from the blueprint of a perfect talk, to how to stand, how to remain composed, and even how to handle those annoying people who have “more of a comment than a question.” She has tips for using Powerpoint slides, and tips for doing a live reading. She even discusses things like podcast interviews or how to talk about your book one-on-one in casual conversation.

There are exercises at the end of every chapter, although I don’t think they’re necessary. Most of them consist of Fasbinder recommending a TED talk, but watching TED talks doesn’t teach you anything about how to give one. It would have been nice to have some exercises about posture or a practice Q and A. Instead, I figured out what to practice on my own from the excellent information and examples in the book.

FROM PAGE TO STAGE is a gift to authors. It’s filled with concrete advice and actionable steps a writer can take to get better at public speaking. It’s the book we need for the skill that we all need to develop.

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FROM PAGE TO STAGE can be found here.

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Rating: 4 stars

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I recommend this book

Seven Tips for Writing in Difficult Times

IMG_20200403_193951_369Hello Friends,

If you’re having trouble writing these days, you’re not alone. Every writer I know is having trouble producing new work—me included. But I’ve put together some strategies that have been helping me, and I think they will help you too. Here are seven ways to keep writing in difficult times.

  1. Write in Smaller Chunks

In ordinary times, we make big writing goals, and then we break them down into manageable steps. In difficult times, you can do the same thing, but make the steps even smaller. Nope, that’s not small enough. Make it smaller yet. Some of my friends are committing to writing 100 words a day. Others are writing fifteen minutes a day. That’s all they can do, and that’s all they need to do.

  1. Write to Prompts

If working on a novel or memoir seems too hard, try writing prompts. They are great writing practice, they will get you thinking differently, and there are no stakes. With a prompt, you can write well or write badly, as long as you’re writing.

  1. Try Editing

Sometimes, you can’t write new material, but you can edit old stuff. There can be great comfort in polishing your work. In times of stress, it’s calming to make order out of chaos.

  1. Don’t Forget to Read

If all else fails, and you can’t write a single thing, try reading. Turn off the news, stop scrolling social media, and just read. You could pick up a book about the craft of writing, or just read in your genre. Being familiar with books in your genre is an important part of a writer’s toolbox, so reading time is part of writing time.

  1. Take on This Identity

Do you call yourself a writer? Why not? If you truly take on that identity, and you know deep in your bones that you’re a writer, then the act of writing will become second nature. You take care of your children, right? Why? Because you’re a parent. You don’t think about it too much, or stress about it, you just do it. You walk your dog because you’re a dog owner. Maybe you cook because you’re a chef or you drive a bus because you’re a bus driver. In the same way, you write because you’re a writer. So take on that identity and allow yourself to write in a more matter-of-fact way.

  1. Find a Buddy

Even if we can’t meet face to face, we can still can still reach out for support. I like to have virtual write-ins with a friend. We’ll agree on a start time and then text each other to say, “Okay, go!” After an hour, we’ll text again, to congratulate each other for a good hour of writing. All you need is a little bit of time and one writing buddy.

  1. Remember This is Temporary

Do you remember the last time your writing was going really well? When you were in the zone, and the words flowed effortlessly? That was a temporary state. It was fun while it lasted, but it eventually ended and you got stuck. But the good news is, being stuck is temporary too! It won’t last forever. A writer is always bouncing back and forth between stuck and unstuck. That’s just the nature of the creative life. A lot of us are feeling stuck right now. None of us will be stuck forever.

I hope everyone is safe, healthy, and well-stocked, and that we’ll all be back to visiting our favorite bookstores and libraries again soon. I’ll post again on the 1st with my next scheduled book review.

 

Alex K.

 

Valentine Giveaway!

It’s almost Valentine’s Day! Time to celebrate people we love, people we like, and people we feel warm affection for.

You know who my favorite person is? YOU. I like everyone who reads this blog and I wish I could buy each of you a present. I can’t buy everyone a present, but I did put together two gift boxes that I will be mailing to two blog readers.

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This year, I’m once again highlighting a how-to book from my favorite writing teacher of all time. THE LIAR’S COMPANION by Lawrence Block is one of his more personal how-to books, detailing his own struggles and triumphs in the era before he was a household name. You’re going to love this book!

This gift box also includes…
•  A blank notebook
•  “You are a badass” sticky notes
•  A coaster
•  And a stand-up pencil holder

But wait! There’s more! It’s Valentine’s Day, when things come in pairs, so of course there are two gift boxes.

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The second gift box features CREATING CHARACTER ARCS by K.M. Weiland. More than any other recent book, this one helped me get super clear on the way that plot and character go hand-in-hand. This book will supercharge your writing craft!

I’m also including the most fun blank notebook I’ve seen lately. That gemstone on the cover has LED lights in it and when you push a button on the cover, the gem lights up. I wish I could explain to you how cool it is, but you will have to see it for yourself.

This gift box also includes…
•  A set of cute erasers
•  A fridge magnet
•  And a list pad to track goals

Want to win one of these gift boxes? Just leave a comment below telling me two things: what is the most recent how-to book you’ve read, and a place I can contact you. (Email, website, or Twitter.)

I’ll draw two random names from the comments to this blog post on February 14, 2020 at 22:00 EST so be sure to comment before then!

And of course I have not one, but two notes.

First note: You don’t have to subscribe to my blog or follow me on social media to enter, but I’d be pleased if you did. (I’m @ AlexKourvo on insta and the twitterz)

Second note: This giveaway is open to everyone but I can only mail stuff to US addresses. If you live outside the US and I draw your name, I’ll send you a $10 Amazon ecard so you can buy Lawrence Block’s book or K.M. Weiland’s book yourself.

Leave me a comment with a book recommendation, and I’ll announce the winners on Valentine’s Day.

xxoo,
Alex K.
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Update: the winner of the Lawrence Block book is Bridget McKenna and the winner of the KM Weiland book is Catherine Stein. Congratulations to the winners!

Writing With Jenna Moreci (YouTube channel)

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My review is a little different this month. I love my how-to books, but I’ve been under deadline pressure and my attention span has suffered. So I’ve been seeking writing advice from podcasts, classes, and YouTube videos. My new favorite YouTube channel is WRITING WITH JENNA MORECI.

Moreci has been vlogging for about four years, so she’s got a lot of great content to choose from. Each video is about twenty minutes long, and tackles a single subject with humor and wisdom. Whether it’s an element of the writing craft or an issue with the writer’s lifestyle, Moreci has a video for you.

WRITING WITH JENNA MORECI is not for the delicate. She gives rapid-fire advice (often in the form of top-ten lists) with no sugar-coating and a whole heap of swear words. She shines a spotlight on a writer’s worst habits and excuses, and tells the truth about how much work goes into writing a publishable book.

Moreci’s advice, though short and to the point, is always solid. She teaches writers how to outline a novel, how to start a novel, how to write a great sex scene or fight scene, and how to ramp things up to a great finish. She also has videos about different genres, explaining which tropes still work, and those that are past their prime. Her videos are aimed at beginners, but even this jaded old pro picked up valuable tips.

Where WRITING WITH JENNA MORECI really excels is in the lifestyle videos. Moreci has videos about writing while holding a day job, dealing with anxiety, writer’s block, and that awful critical voice in our heads. It’s a bit like getting no-nonsense advice from a big sister or favorite aunt. It might not always be easy to hear, but it’s true wisdom from someone who has been there.

Some of my favorite videos are How to Outline Your Novel, How to Overcome Writer’s Block, and my personal favorite, How to Write a Healthy Romance. But all of Moreci’s videos are worth your time.

YouTube will never take the place of the craft books on my shelf, but there are many vloggers putting out great content, and Moreci is tops. I’m glad I can still soak up craft advice even when I’m busy writing novels of my own.

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WRITING WITH JENNA MORECI can be found here.

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Rating: 4 stars

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This channel is best for: beginning writers

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I recommend this channel.